Showing 10 results
Transcend Air Vy 400 City View

Transcend Air Vy 400

Vy 400 Transcend Air Rancho Santa Fe, CA www.transcend.aero The Transcend Air Vy 400 is a tilt-wing Vertical Take-Off and Landing (VTOL) aircraft that is designed for efficient city-to-city transportation. The Vy 400 has fully tilting wings with props powered by a P&WC PT6 -67F turboshaft 1,300 kW  engine. It also employs a collective and a 30 kW electric pusher prop at its tail fan for fly-by-wire envelope protection. It uses Geofencing plus sensors to avoid obstacles. It has a speed 650 km/h and a range of up to 725 km. Its payload is 1,000 kg. It includes whole airframe parachute. The Vy will carry one pilot and five passengers. Units are expected to run $3.5 million dollars. In November 2018 Transcend Air selected VerdeGo Aero to provide a hybrid electric propulsion systems after the turbine version has matured. The company plans to establish a short-haul air service between barges in 46 cities including Boston – New York – Washington D.C., San Francisco – Los Angeles – San Diego or Montreal – Toronto. In September 2018 two electric-powered, one-fifth-scale prototypes flew to evaluate vertical and forward flight transition. This will be followed by a half-scale prototype powered by a smaller PT6 engine to demonstrate the drive train. A 2019, if a Series A round with venture capitalists is successful, a full-scale manned prototype flying in 2021 or 2022. Certification is expected in 2023. The Vy 400 is based on the Elytron Converticopter.   Resources Search eVTOL news posts Website: Transcend Air Article: Transcend Air announces “affordable” city-to-city VTOL aircraft, Vertical Magazine, June 28, 2018 Tags: Transcend, Vectored Thrust, Scaled Prototype, 6 Passengers, Electric/Batteries, Piloted

Piloted

Piloted All eVTOL aircraft that operate with a pilot Aeroxo LV ERA Aviabike AgustaWestland Project Zero (defunct) Airbus CityAirbus Alauda Airspeeder Aquinea Volta Assen A1 Aston Martin Volante Astro AA360 (Passenger Drone) Avianovations Hepard Bay Zoltán Flike Carter Aviation Air Taxi chAIR Multicopter CollaborativeBee Mini-Bee Dekatone Flying Car Dufour aEro 2 EAC Whisper ElectraFly ElectraFlyer Electric Jet EJ-1 Embraer DreamMaker Flexcraft FlytCycle Georgia Tech HummingBuzz Gravity X Hero Flyer Hi-Lite Lynx-us HopFlyt Venturi Hoversurf Scorpion JAXA Hornisse Jetpack Aviation Joby Aviation S4 Kalashnikov (unnamed) Kármán XK-1 Kenyan Passenger Drone Kitty Hawk Flyer Kitty Hawk Flyer (defunct prototype) Leap Vantage Malloy Hoverbike ManDrone Moller Skycar M200 Moller Skycar M400 Napoleon Aero VTOL NASA Puffin Neva AirQuadOne NUS Snowstorm Opener BlackFly Penn State University Blue Sparrow Ray Research Dart Flyer Ray VTOL Aircraft Sikorsky Firefly (defunct) Silverwing S1 Scoop Pegasus 1 Sky-Hopper Solution F Supervolant Pegasus Swarm Multicopter Talaria Hermes I Terrafugia TF-2 Lift + Push Terrafugia TF-2 Tiltrotor Terrafugia TF-X teTra 3 Texas A&M University Harmony Tier 1 Robinson R44 Transcend Air Vy 400 Trek Aerospace FlyKart 2 University of Kansas Mamba Urban Aeronautics CityHawk Varon V200 Vickers WAVE eVTOL Volocopter VC1/VC2 (defunct prototypes) Voyzon Aerospace e-VOTO Workhorse SureFly XTI Aircraft TriFan 600 View all pages with the tag “Piloted”

Electric/Batteries

Electric/Batteries All eVTOL aircraft that utilize electric batteries A³ Vahana AeroMobil 5.0 Aeroxo LV ERA Aviabike AgustaWestland Project Zero (defunct) Airbus CityAirbus AirisOne AirspaceX MOBi Alauda Airspeeder Aquinea Volta Astro AA360 (Passenger Drone) Aurora eVTOL AutoFlightX BAT600 Autonomous Flight Y6S Avianovations Hepard Bartini Flying Car Bay Zoltán Flike Boeing Cargo Aerial Vehicle Carter Air Taxi Cartivator SkyDrive chAIR Multicopter CollaborativeBee Mini-Bee Dekatone Flying Car DeLorean Aerospace DR-7 Digi Robotics DroFire Digi Robotics Droxi EAC Whisper EHang 184 EHang 216 Electric Jet EJ-1 Embraer DreamMaker EVA X01 FlytCycle Georgia Tech HummingBuzz Gravity X Hero Flyer Hi-Lite Lynx-us HopFlyt Venturi Hoversurf Drone Taxi R-1 Hoversurf Formula Hoversurf Scorpion JAXA Hornisse Jetpack Aviation Joby Aviation S2 (defunct) Joby Aviation S4 Kalashnikov (unnamed) Karem Butterfly KARI Optionally Piloted PAV Kármán XK-1 Kenyan Passenger Drone Kitty Hawk Cora Kitty Hawk Flyer Kitty Hawk Flyer (defunct prototype) Leap Vantage LIFT Hexa Lilium Jet Malloy Hoverbike ManDrone Napoleon Aero VTOL NASA Puffin Neoptera eOpter Neva AirQuadOne NUS Snowstorm Opener BlackFly Penn State University Blue Sparrow Piasecki eVTOL Pipistrel (unnamed) Pop.Up Next PteroDynamics Transwing Ray Research Dart Flyer Scoop Pegasus 1 Sikorsky Firefly (defunct) Silverwing S1 Sky-Hopper SKYLYS Aircraft AO Solution F Swarm Multicopter teTra 3 Texas A&M University Harmony Tier 1 Robinson R44 Transcend Air Vy 400 Trek Aerospace FlyKart 2 University of Kansas Mamba Varon V200 Vertical Aerospace Vertiia Vision VTOL Volocopter 2X Volocopter VC1/VC2 (defunct prototypes) Volocopter VC200 Voyzon Aerospace e-VOTO VRCO NeoXCraft Zee Aero Z-P2 Zenith Altitude EOPA View all pages with the tag “Electric/Batteries”

6 Passengers

6 Passengers All eVTOL aircraft that carry six passengers Bell Air Taxi Carter Aviation Air Taxi Pipistrel (unnamed) Transcend Air Vy 400 XTI Aircraft TriFan 600 View all pages with the tag “6 Passengers”

Scaled Prototype

Scaled Prototype All eVTOL aircraft that have been tested at a smaller scale Aergility ATLIS Airbus CityAirbus AirspaceX MOBi Alauda Airspeeder Aurora eVTOL Aurora LightningStrike (defunct) Bartini Flying Car Bay Zoltán Flike Boeing Cargo Aerial Vehicle Cartivator SkyDrive Davinci ZeroG DeLorean Aerospace DR-7 Dufour aEro2 EAC Whisper Electric Jet EJ-1 HopFlyt Venturi JAXA Hornisse Jetoptera J2000 Joby Aviation Lotus (defunct) ManDrone Moller Skycar M200 PteroDynamics Transwing Ray Research Dart Flyer Ray VTOL Aircraft Samad Starling Jet Sikorsky Firefly (defunct) SKYLYS Aircraft AO Talaria Hermes I Transcend Air Vy 400 Urban Aeronautics CityHawk VerdeGo Aero PAT200 Vertical Aerospace Vertiia Vimana AAV View all pages with the tag “Scaled Prototype”

Vectored Thrust

Vectored Thrust An eVTOL aircraft that uses any of its thrusters for lift and cruise A³ Vahana aeroG Aviation aG-4 AgustaWestland Project Zero AirisOne AirspaceX MOBi Aston Martin Volante Aurora Flight Sciences LightningStrike (defunct) Autonomous Flight Y6S Bartini Flying Car Bell Air Taxi Carter Aviation CarterCopter CollaborativeBee Mini-Bee DeLorean Aerospace DR-7 Digi Robotics DroFire Digi Robotics Droxi Dufour aEro2 EVA X01 HopFlyt Venturi JAXA Hornisse 2B Jetoptera J2000 Joby Aviation Lotus (defunct) Joby Aviation S2 (defunct) Joby Aviation S4 Karem Butterfly KARI PAV Kronstadt Air Taxi Lilium Jet Moller Skycar M200 Moller Skycar M400 Neoptera eOpter Opener BlackFly Piasecki eVTOL Pipistrel (unnamed) PteroDynamics Transwing Rolls-Royce EVTOL Sabrewing Draco-2 Sikorsky VERT SKYLYS Aircraft AO Starling Jet Supervolant Pegasus Terrafugia TF-2 Tiltrotor Terrafugia TF-X Transcend Air Vy 400 VerdeGo Aero PAT200 Vertiia Vickers WAVE eVTOL Vimana (unnamed) Vision VTOL Voyzon Aerospace e-VOTO VTOL Aviation Abhiyaan XTI Aircraft Trifan 600 Zenith Altitude EOPA Not what you’re looking for? Check out our listing of all eVTOL aircraft!

Vertical Flight Society logo

AHS is the Vertical Flight Society

AHS is the Vertical Flight Society By Mike Hirschberg, AHS International Executive Director From Vertiflite, May/June 2018 (A pdf of this article is also available.) The Vertical Flight Society Logo  The colors of the AHS logo have long been the red, white and blue of the American flag, signifying the heritage of the Society; these colors are retained in the new logo. The hummingbird, named “Hovey” decades ago, endures as the symbol of vertical flight and of the Society; she also remains outlined in yellow to evoke the gold fringe and eagle that embellish the flag. The name of the Society is also in blue, providing an enduring bond with the vertical flight capabilities of the hummingbird. Finally, the red arc depicts the tip path of rotating blades that generate lift or thrust — the quintessential essence of technology that defines the domain of the Vertical Flight Society.For more on the history of the AHS logo through the ages, go to www.vtol.org/hovey. AHS International is pleased to announce that the Society is rebranding to better reflect our membership and our role in the world. After years of discussion and months of debate, the Board of Directors of AHS International voted to change the identity of AHS to the “Vertical Flight Society,” the moniker that the Society had been using in various forms for at least a half century. While not a legal name change, the “Vertical Flight Society” will become the “trade name” for AHS. The Board approved the change on March 6, after studying the results of multiple surveys, considering the proud legacy of AHS, and debating how to best position the Society for the future. The Society will transition to our new name by Jan. 1, 2019. A Bit of History Although AHS was founded 75 years ago as the “American Helicopter Society, Inc.,” the expansion of the Society beyond helicopters and beyond the US industry began with its birth in 1943. During World War II, engineers and leaders from allied countries joined the nascent Society and took leadership positions. Autogiros, convertiplanes and more advanced configurations were always considered part of the domain of AHS. As noted in previous issues of Vertiflite, the AHS brand evolved over the decades to be ever-more expansive. In the 1950s, when the Society also began to hold a “Western Forum” — west of the Mississippi River — the Annual Forum (then held every year in Washington, D.C.) was called the “Annual National Forum.” In the 1970s, it was renamed the “Annual National V/STOL Forum” — to expand its brand beyond helicopters. But by 1979 (Forum 35), the Society’s leadership recognized that “National” and “American” were no longer entirely accurate representations of the organization; “National” was dropped and the word “International” was added below the American Helicopter Society logo. (See www.vtol.org/history for more background.) As part of the post-Cold War drawdown, the Board of Directors created an ad-hoc Charter Committee in 1992 to review the Society’s charter and the changing industry conditions. The committee concluded that the mission of AHS was “to …

VTOL Execs at Forum 73 Banquet

AHS Commentary: Not Just Helicopters

AHS Commentary: Not Just Helicopters By Mike Hirschberg, AHS International Executive Director Vertiflite Jul-Aug 2017 At the Forum 73 Grand Awards Banquet, the leaders of the major rotorcraft manufacturers and Uber Technologies’ chief of product development talked about the future of vertical flight. Uber imagines a world where on-demand transportation leverages the vertical dimension to connect people efficiently and affordably through a network of vertiports with electrically-powered VTOL aircraft. A score of companies are now developing one- to four-seat aircraft that could enable achieve this vision. (See “Charging Forward”) What does the future hold? We can imagine many different possible outcomes. Within the next few years, we certainly may begin to see urban air taxis shuttling people around town, like taxi cabs and Uber cars do today. In decades to come, electric VTOL aircraft, using multiple small propellers or fans, may become the norm. The conventional helicopter will continue to be the dominant configuration in missions where hovering is critical — and particularly for external lift — for the foreseeable future. And fossil-fueled internal combustion engines (piston and turbine) certainly will remain the standard for large and long-range/endurance applications for decades to come. Nonetheless, many types of VTOL aircraft today are vying to prove their worth. Although AHS was founded in 1943 as the “American Helicopter Society, Inc.,” the original constitution was soon modified to include rotary wing aircraft and then VTOL more broadly. The current AHS bylaws say the purpose of the Society is to “advance the theory and practices of the science of vertical flight aircraft.” Looking back through the Society’s history, VTOL beyond helicopters — however you define it — has long been a central theme. By way of example, when AHS established its scholarship/educational outreach arm 50 years ago, it wasn’t called the “Helicopter Foundation” — but rather, the Vertical Flight Foundation. In 1966, AHS initiated the Paul E. Haueter Memorial Award, “for significant contribution to the field of vertical take-off and landing aircraft other than helicopters.” LTV Aerospace was the first awardee for the four-engine XC-142A tiltwing, followed in 1967 by Hawker Siddeley Aviation for the development of the Kestrel/Harrier jump jet. In the 1970s, the Annual Forum was called the “Annual National V/STOL Forum,” but then the Society’s leadership recognized that “National” and “American” were no longer sufficient to represent the organization, and added the word “International” below the original AHS logo. The Society began calling itself “An International Vertical Flight Organization” in 1992 and unofficially changed the name to “AHS International” in soon after, with the tagline “The Vertical Flight Society” — because “American” and “Helicopter” were far too limiting descriptors of AHS’s vision and legacy. So, like BAE Systems, CHC Helicopters, MD Helicopters, PHI and many others, the organization sought to transcend the acronym. Past Vertiflites are replete with photos and articles on non-helicopter vertical flight aircraft. And AHS became known as a leader of advocacy for tiltrotor technology in the 1990s, with my predecessor, Rhett Flater, meeting with White House, NASA and …