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Kiwigogo T-One

Kiwigogo T-One
Kiwigogo
Qingdao City, Shandong Province, China
www.kiwigogo.com

Entrepreneur Wang Tan, from China, has designed and created an award winning electric vertical takeoff and landing (eVTOL) single passenger multicopter for personal and commercial use. The aircraft has a maximum speed of 72 km/h (45 mph) and a range of 30 km (18.5 miles) or 30 minutes, which ever comes first.

The company says the aircraft can resist strong crosswinds due to its eight independently computer controlled propellers and advanced flight controls, ensuring stability of the aircraft in all wind conditions. Safety features include redundancy with the multiple propellers, engines and computer systems. If one of the electric motors fail, the computer will immediately keep the aircraft balanced to continue flying safely.

The aircraft has manual pilot control, automatic flight modes, gyroscopic stability system, GPS navigation, comfortable seating and landing skids.

The company plans to sell their aircraft to the end-user and companies for use in Urban Air Mobility (UAM) programs. They also predict that the aircraft will be utilized in rescue missions, such as mountain rescues. 

Specifications:

  • Aircraft type: eVTOL
  • Capacity: 1 passenger
  • Cockpit: Open
  • Piloting: Piloted or autonomous
  • Maximum speed of 72 km/h (45 mph)
  • Range of 30 km (18.5 miles) or 30 minutes
  • Maximum altitude of 3,000 m (9,650 ft)
  • Maximum take-off weight: 800 kg (1,734 lbs)
  • Propellers: 8
  • Electric engines: 8
  • Electric motor output: 80 kW, each
  • Windows: Front windshield, sides are open
  • Landing gear: Skid 
  • Safety features: Has multiple redundancy features, advanced flight control to keep the aircraft stable in windy or gusty conditions to ensure safe flight. Distributed Electric Propulsion (DEP), provides safety through redundancy for its passengers and/or cargo. DEP means having multiple propellers and motors on the aircraft so if one or more motors or propellers fail, the other working motors and propellers can safely land the aircraft.

 
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